Oct 15, 2019  
2017-18 Course Catalog 
    
2017-18 Course Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Academic Information



Final Exams

It is Bellevue College policy that final exams may be used only in connection with other evaluative techniques throughout each period of instruction, and that no examination, including the final exam, shall make up more than 33% of a student’s final grade. Students are encouraged to consult with their instructors concerning the specific results of examinations, quizzes, or other evaluative techniques or circumstances.

Grades

Students will have access to grades in several ways, approximately five days after the quarter ends:

  • on the web: go to www.bellevuecollege.edu/services/
  • on the kiosks in the Student Affairs Building: choose the “Student Schedule” button,
  • through the mail: student must leave a self-addressed stamped envelope at the Student Service Center; write your student ID on the inside of the flap, or
  • in person: request a copy of your class schedule at the Student Service Center.

Bellevue College uses the following grading system and standards in evaluating student performance:

“A” grades indicate “outstanding” achievement:

A = 4.0 points per credit hour
A- = 3.7 points per credit hour

The “A” student

  • demonstrates consistent mastery of learning outcomes for the course;
  • demonstrates ability to interpret, integrate, and apply learning outcomes beyond the context of the course through application of critical and creative thinking skills;
  • completes work assignments that consistently exceed requirements and that interpret and apply objectives in new, unique, or creative ways;
  • demonstrates consistent leadership in class participation activities.

“B” grades indicate “high” achievement:

B+ = 3.3 points per credit hour
B = 3.0 points per credit hour
B- = 2.7 points per credit hour

The “B” student

  • demonstrates a high level of competence in learning outcomes for the course;
  • demonstrates ability to interpret, integrate, and apply learning outcomes within the context of the course through application of critical and creative thinking skills;
  • completes work assignments that consistently meet most requirements;
  • contributes regularly to class participation activities.

“C” grades indicate “satisfactory” achievement*:

C+ = 2.3 points per credit hour
C = 2.0 points per credit hour
C- = 1.7 points per credit hour

The “C” student

  • demonstrates a satisfactory level of competence in learning outcomes for the course;
  • demonstrates competent ability to interpret, integrate, and apply learning outcomes within the context of the course;
  • completes work assignments that satisfy minimum requirements for the course;
  • satisfies minimum requirements for class participation activities.

*A cumulative GPA of 2.0 or above is required to earn a degree or certificate at BC.

“D” grades indicate “poor” achievement:

D+ = 1.3 points per credit hour
D = 1.0 point per credit hour

The “D” student

  • demonstrates minimum competence in some learning outcomes for the course;
  • completes work assignments that usually meet minimum requirements;
  • contributes inconsistently or infrequently to class participation activities.

“F” grades indicate “unsatisfactory” achievement:

F = 0 points per credit hour

The “F” student

  • cannot demonstrate competence in many or fundamental learning outcomes;
  • submits work assignments that frequently do not meet minimum requirements, or does not complete the assigned work;
  • does not satisfy minimum requirements for attendance or contribution to class activities.

Students should be aware that the instructor determines whether the class will be evaluated using the “F” grade.

Passing = P

No points are calculated for a “P” grade, which is issued in two separate instances: 1) for those courses institutionally designated as using the “P/F” grade and 2) for courses graded using “A” through “F” in which a student elects to be evaluated “pass/fail.” In the former instance the instructor may issue only a P or F grade. In the latter instance, all “P” grades must be supported with traditional letter grades (not recorded in the system), and when the student fails to receive a grade of “A” through “D,” a grade of “F” will be assigned and calculated into the grade-point average. Courses which a student elects to take “pass/fail” may not be used to satisfy distribution requirements in the arts and sciences or science degrees. A student must declare intention for a “P/F” grade within the first 10 days of the quarter by filing the request in the Student Service Center.

Credit/Noncredit = CR/NC

Credit/noncredit (“CR/NC”) is a grade granted for specific courses as determined by the college. Students may not choose this grading option. No points are calculated into the grade-point average.

Official Withdrawal = W

Official withdrawals are accepted and recorded on different schedules during the academic year and during Summer Quarter.

During Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters withdrawals are recorded as follows:

  • Through the tenth day of the quarter, the dropped course does not become part of the transcript record.
  • After the tenth school day and through the end of the seventh week of the quarter, the “W” grade will become part of the student’s transcript record, regardless of grade status at this time.
  • No official withdrawal will be permitted after the start of the eighth week of the quarter.

During Summer Quarter withdrawals are recorded as follows:

  • Through the sixth day of the quarter, the dropped course does not become a part of the transcript record.
  • After the sixth day and through the end of the fifth week of the quarter, the “W” grade will become part of the student’s transcript record, regardless of grade status at this time.
  • No official withdrawal will be permitted after the start of the sixth week of a Summer Quarter.
  • For late start classes, visit the online enrollment calendar at www.bellevuecollege.edu/studentcentral/calendar/ for information.

Hardship Withdrawal = HW

HW indicates a withdrawal request made because of extenuating circumstances after the official withdrawal period is over. The student must contact the instructor to request this withdrawal option, or the faculty member may initiate the contact. No points are calculated into the grade-point average.

Audit = N

Not counted for credit or grade-point average. A student must declare intention to audit a course within the first 10 days of a quarter by filing the request in the Registration Office.

Course in Progress = Y

This symbol indicates a course which, by authorization of the Executive Dean of Instruction, officially continues beyond the terminal date of the present quarter. Normally, the course is completed and graded on or before the termination of the subsequent quarter.

Incomplete = I

No points are calculated for this grade. An “I” grade indicates that the student has not completed specific prescribed requirements for a course, usually for unforeseen reasons beyond the student’s control. The student is responsible for requesting the assignment of an “I” grade and for demonstrating why the “I” is appropriate. Granting the request and assigning the “I” grade is the prerogative of the instructor.

If a student has performed at a passing level during the quarter but for some reason is unable to complete the course requirements, he/she may be assigned an “I” grade at the course instructor’s discretion. The nature of the deficiency must be such that removal of an “I” grade is not contingent on subsequent enrollment in the same course by the student.

An “I” will be posted to the transcript when submitted by the instructor with a contractual form which specifically indicates the work the student must complete to make up the deficiency and the date by which the deficiency must be resolved. Both the instructor and the student must sign the contract. The work for the course must be completed before the end of the next quarter (by the end of the following Fall term if the “I” is given in the Spring term), and an extension can be granted only with the instructor’s approval. If the student fails to complete the designated assignment(s), an “F” grade will be posted.

Grading for OLS Program

All courses for Associate in Occupational & Life Skills (OLS) are Pass/Fail. OLS uses a grading system that measures performance indicators directly related to 21st Century Skills and BC approved course outcomes. The student receives a final report with instructor’s narrative of student’s performance in the course. At least 70 % of the performance indicators and 70% of the course outcomes for each course are
required to be met to receive a passing grade (P).

Academic Standards

Academic Progress

Students must earn a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better to remain in good academic standing. The following consequences will be imposed progressively for students who are not in good academic standing.

  • Academic Warning
  • Academic Probation
  • One (1) Quarter Academic Dismissal
  • Four (4) Quarter Academic Dismissal

*Consecutive quarter is defined to mean the next quarter in which a student is enrolled even if a break in time occurs. Note: Students will remain at currently assigned academic standard level if cumulative GPA remains below 2.0 but quarterly GPA reaches 2.0 or better.

Academic Warning

Students carrying five or more credits will be placed on Academic Warning at the end of any quarter in which their quarterly GPA is below 2.0 Students who fail to make satisfactory progress over time will be placed on the next level of academic intervention. There is no appeal process to this level of intervention.

Academic Probation

Students carrying five or more credits will be placed on Academic Probation at the end of any quarter in which their quarterly GPA is below 2.0 for a second consecutive quarter.

Students placed on Academic Warning or Academic Probation will be sent a letter that offers effective study tips and strongly encourages students to take advantage of college support resources for education planning.

Students on Academic Probation are required to complete an Academic Probation Contract that outlines steps for improving the student’s academic performance. A student on Academic Probation will be required to meet with an Academic Advisor, Counselor, or designated Faculty member (in certain programs) to review the plan prior to registration. Online registration will be blocked while the student remains on Academic Probation. There is no appeal process to this level of intervention.

One Quarter Academic Dismissal

Students carrying five or more credits will be placed on 1 Quarter Academic Dismissal at the end of any quarter in which their quarterly GPA is below 2.0 for a third consecutive quarter.

Students placed on 1 Quarter Academic Dismissal will not be permitted to register for any courses for credit the subsequent quarter. Dismissed students will be blocked from registering. Students who enrolled for classes prior to suspension status will be administratively withdrawn, and tuition paid will be refunded.

Students placed on 1 Quarter Academic Dismissal will be sent a letter that outlines the appeal process for reinstatement. To be considered for reinstatement, students must outline a plan for making measurable and substantial progress towards improving their grade point average and meet in person with the Dean of Student Success or designee.

All appeals are reviewed by the Dean of Student Success. If approved, the student will continue on probationary status until satisfactory academic progress has been met for two quarters or longer. Notification will be sent to the student outlining conditions of reinstatement.

Four Quarter Academic Dismissal

Students carrying five or more credits will be placed on 4 Quarter Academic Dismissal at the end of any quarter in which their quarterly GPA is below 2.0 for a fourth consecutive quarter.

Students placed on 4 Quarter Academic Dismissal will not be permitted to register for any courses for four quarters. Dismissed students will be blocked from registering. Students who enrolled for classes prior to suspension status will be administratively withdrawn, and tuition paid will be refunded.

Students placed on 4 Quarter Academic Dismissal will be sent a letter that outlines the appeal process for reinstatement. The student must submit to the Vice President of Student Affairs a suitable plan to improve academic performance. The student may be referred to an Academic Advisor, Counselor, or designated Faculty member (in certain programs) helps with the student’s progress.

Petitions to appeal an academic dismissal must be received in writing in the office of the Vice President of Student Affairs at least two weeks prior to the start of the quarter in which the student wishes to enroll. If approved, the student will continue on probationary status until satisfactory academic progress has been met for two quarters or longer. Notification will be sent to the student outlining conditions or reinstatement.

Contesting a Grade

If a student wishes to contest the accuracy of a grade, it is important to consult with the instructor involved immediately.

The instructors receive audit sheets of the grades they have awarded in their classes during the first 10 days of the next regular quarter. Errors may be noted on this audit sheet, and corrected, with minimal problem to the student. After the tenth day of the following quarter, the student has only one year in which to correct a grading error. If the instructor is no longer employed at this college, or is away from the campus for an extended time, students wishing to correct a grading error should talk with the division dean of that faculty member. After one year, grades are not changed except for extraordinary reasons.

Repeating a Course

Students may repeat a course taken at Bellevue College in order to improve their skills or the course grade. All course repeats must comply with the Procedures for Repeating a Course.

  • The course repeat policy only applies to courses that are taken at Bellevue College.
  • A course may be repeated only twice (taken a total of three times) unless otherwise specified in the college catalog.
  • Credit for any course is earned only once (except courses designed to be taken multiple times, as noted in the course catalog).
  • Only the highest grade awarded will be used in computing the Bellevue College GPA.
  • Each grade received will remain on the student’s transcript; the Registrar will place an “R” next to other grade(s) received for that course.
  • Courses must be repeated for a letter grade unless the course is offered only as pass/fail.
  • The course repeat process DOES NOT apply to grade symbols: I, NC, W, HW, Y or Z.
  • The Bellevue College repeat policy may or may not be recognized by other institutions, at their sole discretion.
  • To repeat a course, students must re-register and pay all necessary tuition and fees.

Student Records

Student records include all information the College collects from you, or creates for you starting at the time of admission through graduation or completion of program. Student records include paper files and documents held in college offices, and electronic records, including those in our student database.

Student records do not include information collected or created based on individual counseling sessions provided by our Counseling Center, and records related to law enforcement, which includes our Public Safety Office.

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) governs access and disclosure of student records. FERPA is a federal law that gives students three primary rights:

  1. The right of students to inspect and review their own education records.
  2. The right of students to have some control over release or use of information contained in their records.
  3. The right of students to ask the college to correct or change incorrect information in their records.

The college notifies students of these rights and provides other information about access and disclosure of records at the beginning of each quarter using the students’ BC Email Address. A copy of the notification is available in Student Central upon request.

Transcripts

A permanent official transcript will be sent to the student, a college, university, or other agency upon the student’s written request ONLY. Requests for transcripts may be made in person or online or mail a written request. Students must provide the following information: student name, ID number, student signature, date of request and the name and mailing address of the institution or agency to receive the official transcript. Access to grades may be withheld if any financial or other obligations are not fulfilled such as outstanding tuition and fees or fines, or for unreturned college property. There is a processing fee for each official transcript ordered. For instructions on ordering transcripts, call (425) 564-2222 or go to the BC website.

Course Numbering

In general, the course numbers from 001-099 designate pre-college or developmental level courses. Classes numbered from 100-299 are lower division college level. Courses numbered 300-499 are upper division bachelor-degree level. The course numbers 199 or 299 designate independent studies classes. Courses numbered 198 or 298 are special seminar classes. The courses numbers 194/195/196/197 or
294/295/296/297 are assigned for special topics classes. Only college level courses numbered 100 and above can apply to a Bellevue degree or certificate. Courses numbered below 100, however, can be used to meet some prerequisite or proficiency requirements.

Courses listed in this catalog constitute the total academic program of the college, but not all courses are offered every quarter or every year. Consult the quarterly schedule of classes for a list of specific course offerings.

Alternate Options for Earning Credits

In addition to earning credits by taking BC classes, students have other options for applying college level credits toward a BC degree or certificate. These options are listed below. For a credit evaluation, students must submit official transcripts or test score reports to the appropriate department.

Credits Earned at Other Institutions

In general, BC only accepts credits earned at institutions accredited by their regional accrediting association provided that such credits have been earned through college-level courses that are applicable to the student’s program at BC. Credits from non-regionally accredited institutions follow the college’s policies and procedures for awarding non-traditional credit (see the section for Non-Traditional Credits).

There are six regional accrediting agencies. College level credits earned at the institutions accredited by one of the following regional accrediting agencies are acceptable to BC’s degree or certificate programs based on their applicability.

  • New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC)
  • North Central Association Commission on Accreditation and School Improvement (NCA)
  • Middle States Association of Schools and Colleges (MSA)
  • Southern Association of Schools and Colleges (SACS)
  • Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC)
  • Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges (NWCCU)

The college reserves the right to accept or reject credits earned at other institutions of higher education. Currently enrolled students pursuing a degree or certificate may request an official evaluation to have their transfer credits reviewed by the Evaluations/Graduation Office. The information recorded on transfer credits and the transfer GPA become part of the student’s record; however, they are not part of the
student’s official transcript. Not all transfer credits may apply toward graduation requirements. To view the transfer course equivalency tables, visit www.bellevuecollege.edu/transfer/.

Tech Prep College Connections

Tech Prep is a dual-credit program that enables high school students to earn college credit for certain career and technical education courses taken at their high school. Any high school student may take a Tech Prep course, but only those who successfully complete the course with a “B” grade or higher will be eligible to earn college credit. Students must register with our consortium Tech Prep College Connections online at www.techprepcc.org.

College in the High School

High school students may earn both high school and college credit by taking courses through the College in High School program coordinated by local high schools and colleges. Students take these credits at their own high school. They may choose to pay a fee to co-enroll in the equivalent class at college. Information is available through the high schools in the area. (Also see Other Educational Opportunities .)

Running Start

Running Start is a dual-credit program that enables qualified students to earn high school and college credit simultaneously. Students classified as high school juniors or seniors may apply to this program. (Also see Other Educational Opportunities .)

Reciprocity Agreement

Washington community and technical colleges (CTCs) offer reciprocity to students transferring within the CTC system who are pursuing the Direct Transfer Agreement (DTA) degree or the Associate in Science-Transfer (AS) degree. Students who completed an individual course that met distribution degree requirements or fulfilled entire areas of their degree requirements at one college will be considered to have met those same requirements if they plan to complete the same degree when they transfer to another community or technical college in Washington. These degree requirements include Communication
Skills, Quantitative Skills, or one or more Distribution Area requirements, and also Cultural Diversity. Students must initiate the review process and must be prepared to provide necessary documentation to the Evaluations Office. Students must meet residence credit and continuous enrollment requirements at BC.

Non-Traditional Credits

The college awards non-traditional credit for work completed in private study, at non-accredited institutions, military training, other industry related certificates and trainings, and for certain examinations. The following applies:

  • Transferability of awarded credits are subject to the policies of the receiving institution and the college makes no claim regarding the application or transfer of awarded credits to the programs at other institutions.
  • Some Non-Traditional Credit options charge a fee.

In accordance with the standards set by the State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, the college recognizes four categories of Credit for Non-Traditional Learning:

  1. Credit by Testing: Includes commonly accepted higher education equivalency exams that are documented via a transcript or other official record. Awarded credit is based on the type of test and test scores. Tests include:
    • Advanced Placement (AP)
    • International Baccalaureate (IB)
    • College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
    • DANTES Subject Standardized Tests (DSST)
    • Cambridge “A” Level Exam
  2. Prior Experiential Learning: Knowledge and skills acquired through experience alone, evaluated (subjectively) by faculty via evaluation of a compilation of work. Includes Portfolio Review and HS21+ Portfolio Review for students interested in obtaining a high school diploma.
  3. Extra-Institutional Learning: Knowledge and skills acquired outside the institution and objectively verified through third-party certifications, industry-recognized testing/training, and crosswalks. Includes military training.
  4. Course Challenges (formerly Credit by Examination): Challenge examinations are instructor-designed, and sufficiently comprehensive to determine that the student has the same knowledge and skills as those students who enroll in, and successfully complete the course. A student should have previous training, private study, work experience, or other bona fide qualifications indicating the student has knowledge or abilities equivalent to course completers. Other conditions apply. Not all college courses have a Course Challenge option.

Credit Restrictions

Cross-Listed Courses

Certain courses are cross-listed in more than one discipline. Only one of the cross-listed courses may be taken for credits, not both. For example, the catalog description for POLS 201  states “Same as PHIL 201 . Either POLS 201  or PHIL 201  may be taken for credit, not both.”

Out-of-Sequence Courses

Credits in composition, mathematics, world language, or science have to be taken in sequence. Out-of-sequence courses, in general, will not be applied towards graduation if completed after a more advanced level course has been completed. Student should check with the school they plan to transfer on the out-of-sequence policy.

Parallel Courses

Credit is not awarded for those courses that are similar enough in content that students should not receive credit for both classes. The courses will have different titles, course descriptions, and learning outcomes, but credit is not granted for both. For example, the catalog will specify “Either MATH& 141 - Precalculus I  or MATH 138 - College Algebra for Business & Social Science  may be taken for credit, not both.”

Residency Credit Requirement

At least one-third of the credits required for an associate degree or certificate must be completed in residence at BC. For a bachelor’s degree, at least 45 credits applied to the degree must be completed in residence at BC, of which 30 credits must be upper division.

Continuous Enrollment

Students in professional/technical programs may elect to graduate under the provisions of the official catalog in effect at the time they first started at the college OR at the time they apply to graduate, providing three years have not lapsed and they have remained continuously enrolled at the college. Students in transfer degree programs must follow current degree requirements to ensure their transferability to four-year baccalaureate colleges or universities.

Maximum Transfer Credit

Credits transferred from other institutions cannot exceed two-thirds of the credits required by the degree or certificate. All credits are subject to approval by the Evaluations Office based on credit equivalency, applicability to the degree or certificate, and the institution’s accreditation

The college reserves the right to accept or reject credit earned in professional, vocational or technical courses. Departments may review course equivalencies or requirements completed at other institutions. Some programs have provisions that coursework completed to satisfy degree or certificate requirements must be current. Previously completed credits may have exceeded the maximum length of time that
can lapse from time of completion.

World Languages Courses

The World Languages department strongly recommends that native speakers of a language do not take first-year courses in that language. Native language is defined as the language spoken in the student’s home during the first six years of his or her life and in which he or she received instruction through the seventh grade. A first year course would be an incorrect placement for a student fitting this definition. Native-speaking students may either study another language in the program, or contact the World Languages coordinator of their language for correct placement at a higher level.

This recommendation applies as well to heritage speakers for whom first year language courses are not an appropriate placement. A heritage speaker is defined as a student who has had the language spoken in the home from childhood, but has received limited or no instruction in that language. The World Languages program recommends that heritage speakers consult with the coordinator of their language for their correct placement level or consider another language offered by the program. Native and heritage speakers using one hundred level coursework for transfer credit at a university should check with the college/university for individual transfer credit policy.

Academic Internships

BC develops internship positions for students with a wide range of businesses, non-profit agencies, governmental organizations, and BC programs, so that students will have the opportunity to engage in meaningful work-based learning related to their studies at the college. The college’s Internship Program will assist students with resume and interviewing strategies, help them identify positions related to their career path, and enroll them for academic credit in EXPRL 191  or EXPRL 192 , or EXPRL 193  if they are selected for an internship. The internship is guided by well-defined learning goals that each student chooses with the help of faculty and agency personnel. Students may participate in an internship to help decide on a career path, to learn more about their chosen field, or to make connections for career advancement.

Academic Service Learning

Many classes at BC have a service learning component, project as part of their class work. The service is integrated with class instruction and focuses on critical, reflective thinking and civic responsibility. It is tied to the learning outcomes for the course. Please check the course schedule for classes that provide service learning opportunities.

Graduation and Transfer Rates

Federal Graduation Rate Survey Information for Bellevue College (status of Fall 2010 cohort)
Combined transfer out/completion/graduation (within 150% normal time): 45.6%
GRS completion or graduation rate (within 150% normal time): 26.4%
GRS transfer-out rate (non-completers only within 150% normal time): 19.0%
Transfer out rate (completers and non-completers): 31.6%
GRS completion or graduation rate (within 8 years: Fall 2008 cohort): 42.0%
Students still enrolled after four years: 13.0%
BC provides this information pursuant to the federal Student-Right-to-Know Act, so that prospective students can make informed decision about colleges they might wish to attend. The federal Graduation Rate Survey definitions pertain to a very small group of BC students: new students, attending full time, with degree or certificate intentions.

Academic Concentration

Certain departments and programs at BC offer an “academic concentration” option. Students who are pursuing an Associate in Arts and Science transfer degree may elect to complete such a concentration for notation on their transcripts and diplomas. The academic concentration shows that the student has spent the time and effort to acquire depth in a particular discipline, in addition to meeting BC’s normal breadth of requirements. The “concentration” discipline may be the student’s intended major at a baccalaureate institution or it may simply be a topic he or she is interested in studying in depth.

A student is eligible to apply for an academic concentration if:

  • the department has been approved to offer the concentration option (check the departmental list below);
  • the student is pursuing an Associate in Arts and Science transfer degree; and
  • the student submits an application approved by the program chair of the department.

Students must complete 20 credit hours in the concentration discipline as determined by the program. When a student satisfies the Associate in Arts and Sciences and the concentration requirements, her/his degree designation reads “Associate in Arts and Sciences with a Concentration in …” (for example, Associate in Arts and Sciences with a Concentration in Music).

Programs with an Academic Concentration:

  • Anthropology
  • Art
  • Criminal Justice
  • Communication Studies
  • Cultural & Ethnic Studies
  • English
  • Film Studies
  • Gender Studies
  • Geography
  • Mathematics
  • Music
  • Philosophy
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Sociology
  • Sustainability
  • Theatre Arts /Drama